Keeping track of historic bass fishing data has never been one of my strengths. I lived and covered some of the western scene, but chasing the ardent, younger cadre of anglers now on the water, there’s just not a lot of time to gather up so many past moments. However, that doesn’t mean the work won’t be done.

The Bass Fishing Archives just announced today the launch of a new website http://bassfishingarchives.com/, the Sole Source for Bass Fishing History. Developed by outdoor writer TerryBattisti you’ll find the effort fascinating.  His close ties with many of the history -makers (with assistance from various colleagues), make him the ideal person to cover the history of the sport from West to East and all locales in between.

The new site will preserve the record of bass fishing’s early days through the use of old ads, feature articles about anglers and tactics, angler pictures and profiles, and short snippets that’ll jog every angler’s memory. And only a guy with a real passion for this work can do it right.

“I’ve always been a fanatic about the ways anglers ‘used’ to catch bass and have been a student of bass fishing nearly my whole life,” Terry said. “This site has brought all of that together for me and I hope the readers enjoy reading our stuff as much as we enjoy putting it together.”

Talented outdoor writer Pete Robbins commented on the project saying, “I’m jealous that Terry came up with the idea first and thankful that he’s allowing me to contribute. If we don’t document this history immediately, much of it will end up lost.”

But there is something even better about this effort: the site will welcome input – in the form of comments, questions and article ideas – from both fishing fans and members of the industry. “No idea is too big or too small, so long as it furthers our mission,” Battisti said.

Pretty cool.

In this same vein, the hard copy versions of A Gathering of Eagles sold out, so that collectible is gone forever. However, you can still look it over (for free) in its digital version by clicking here.

 




3 Responses to “Go way back: Bass Fishing Archives unveiled”


Thanks for the post and kind words George. I hope at some point you can contribute to the site as you were one of the people I grew up reading and one of the reasons I started down the path of becoming a writer.

Terry

Great news and a great idea. Terry wrote an article about Dick Trask a few years back that was really good. If the new sight reflects that kind of insight and passion then we’re in for a treat – and a lot of hard (and appreciated) work for Terry.

I think it’s just the best thing in bass fishing that has been done since bass fishing has come into it’s own. I know that some important things have happened in bass fishing equipment. I have some fishing history that I know that you don’t know about and in time I would like to tell “Bass History” the unknown story! I had a great thrill in my young life when I talked to a man named Lew Childre – just days before his death. He had agreed to try a new invention of mine that would have launched his rod and reel company into the fore-front of bass fishing technology, and it’s just possible that it would have taken over the number one spot in the fishing industry. Keep in touch with me for what Paul Harvey says,” for the rest of the story.” Paul Blackburn, 122 West Martin Luther King Blvd. Fayetteville, AR. 72701, Ph. 479-304-8529